Matches

Article – ‘Canadian a Canelones’ at www.minuto.com.uy

For all of our Spanish-speaking readers – a very interesting article and interview with Fernando Aldao, a Uruguayan living in Canada, and co-founder of Canadian SC, a professional soccer club that is now playing in the Primera (2nd Division) in Uruguay.  I have known Fernando for four years now, and in 2013 I had the opportunity to work with Canadian SC, conducting fitness assessments during the pre-season for their first-ever season in the Primera (they went on to finish in 8th place).

The article is in Spanish, but even if you don’t speak the language, Google translator can help!  It’s a compelling story about a unique Uruguayan professional club – one that has a Canadian flag on the crest of their jersey!

Here is the link to the article:

http://www.minuto90.com.uy/sitio/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=3068%3Acanadian-a-canelones&Itemid=56

I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.

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Fitness, For Parents, Science

Article – “Manchester United Youth Development Philosophy” from cantpasscantplay.com

Below is a link to an excellent article recently posted on http://www.cantpasscantplay.com, a soccer blog.  It contains an interview with Tony Strudwick, Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for Manchester United Football Club.  Among the points Mr. Strudwick makes are that young players need “multi-sport athleticism”, which can only be obtained by participating in other sports in addition to soccer.  This approach is certainly not unique to Manchester United (or many other European clubs, for that matter), however, often times in North America we adopt an “early specialization” model, which may force young athletes to forego the benefits of “multi-sport athleticism”.

Here is the link to the article:

http://www.cantpasscantplay.com/blog/2015/2/11/manchester-united-youth-development-philosophy

I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.

Fitness, Science

Article – “Core Confusion: The Truth About Squats and Dead Lifts” – by Nick Tumminello – posted on T-Nation.com

Below is a link to a very interesting article written by Nick Tumminello, posted on http://www.t-nation.com yesterday. The article discusses and challenges the notion that traditional barbell leg exercises (squats, dead lifts) provide enough of a stimulus to the “core muscles” that other core and abdominal exercises are not necessary.  The idea that squats and dead lifts are a sufficient replacement for abdominal exercises has been a relatively wide-held belief lately, however, as the article points out, this belief is mainly based on misrepresented facts and a misunderstanding of the results of some recent research into the topic.

It is refreshing to see a science-based approach that considers not only some authors’ conclusions (which can be misleading), but the actual specific results of the studies in question.  Fitness coaches working with soccer players should be interested in this topic – I know I am!

Here is the link to the article:

http://www.t-nation.com/training/core-confusion#.VOKARztBqxE.facebook

I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.

For Parents, Science

Article – “Our Biggest Mistake: Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification” from www.getsportiq.com

Below is a link to a very interesting article written by John O’Sullivan, published on http://www.getsportiq.com in 2013.  The article discusses the differences between coaches who select for talent (which is easy to do), and those who identify talent (much more challenging and described as an “art”).

One quote from this article that really stood out to me was the following passage about the types of athletes/players who may be “identified”, rather than “selected”:

“Perhaps they have not yet grown, or been exposed to high-level coaching. Perhaps they are not as skilful yet, but show a high level of coachability, sensitivity to training and the motivation to learn. Identifying talent requires the skill to weigh all the physical, physiological, psychological and technical components of an athlete, as well as a measure of “gut instinct” of which kid has what it takes to become elite, and which kid does not.”

I really enjoyed this article and I feel that it is very relevant to youth soccer here in Ontario and Canada.  I think you will enjoy it as well.  Here is the link:

http://www.getsportiq.com/2013/12/our-biggest-mistake-talent-selection-instead-of-talent-identification/

I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.

Fitness, Science

Our Research – Effectiveness of Treadmill vs Ground-Based Repeated Sprint Training on Speed and High Intensity Running Ability in Youth Female Soccer Players

Treadmill training works!  Below is a link to our article, which describes our recent study done at the Soccer Fitness Training Centre, comparing a high speed/high incline treadmill repeated sprint training program with a ground-based repeated sprint training program.  In only 6 weeks, and two 30-minute training sessions per week, we saw significant improvements in running speed and endurance.  Read the article below – the results speak for themselves!

Bucciarelli,Yousefian,Cresser,Rupf-Effectiveness of treadmill vs ground-based repeated sprint training on sprint time and high-intensity running ability in youth female soccer players

I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.

Fitness, For Parents, Science

Article – Impact of Puberty on Youth Soccer – From goalnation.com

Below is a link to a very interesting article written by Llyod Biggs (A coach and sports scientist from California) in which he interviews Paul Hart, a Strength and Conditioning Coach at UCSB and former professional soccer player from the United Kingdom.  The interview discusses Mr. Hart’s thoughts on age-appropriate fitness and physical training for youth soccer players.  Considering all of the work I have been doing in the past two years with several different Ontario Player Development League (OPDL) teams, comprising elite male and female players aged U13 and up, this interview was a great read for me.  I especially liked this closing comment from Mr. Biggs:

In the perfect world — regarding the physical fitness of youth soccer players — each player would be monitored as an individual and data collected to understand when the peak growth spurts were taking place. Fitness testing would also be tracked to allow us to see the specific strengths and weaknesses of the individual player, and specific training plans would be modelled for each individual.

Here is the link to the article:

http://goalnation.com/take-best/

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this topic.  Drop me a line here to get the conversation started.